top of page
Scented Candle

HOW TO CARE FOR AND USE YOUR CANDLE SAFELY

How to light a wooden wick candle:

You'll want to light these differently from cotton wicks, but it's very simple - When lighting a wood wick candle, the best technique is to tilt it on an angle and let the flame draw across the length of the wick (kind of like how you tilt a match after lighting).

Why Your Wood Wick Candle Won’t Stay Lit (And How To Fix It)

The gentle crackle and unique flicker of wood wick candles make for a super cosy ambience, but they can be a little tricky to burn if you're not used to them. Wooden wicks burn a bit differently than traditional cotton wicks do, and there are a few common issues that cause them to not stay lit. Here are our top 3 tips to get the best results from your wood wick candles:

1) The first burn is the most important - how to do it right Give your candle enough burning time to develop a melted wax pool that goes all the way to the edge of the container on the first use - this can take up to a few hours, depending on candle size. Believe it or not, your jar candles have a kind of “wax-memory,” and once a burning pattern has been established, it can be hard to change. If you don’t allow your candle enough time to form a full melt pool on the first burn, a little depression or “tunnel” may start to form around the wick. This will make it more difficult for the wax around the edges of the jar to melt, causing the tunnelling effect to continue with each burn. Eventually the tunnel will become too deep for fresh oxygen to flow in, and your candle will have trouble staying lit for more than short periods of time. To prevent this issue, make sure to give your candle enough time to develop a melted wax pool that goes all the way to the edge of the container the first time you use it. This is a good practice for all jar candles, not just those with wooden wicks! This melt pool can take 2 hours or more to form, depending on the candle size, so wait to light up your new candle until you have some time to burn. After the first use, you don’t have to let a full wax pool form every single time, but it is ideal if you want to get the most life out of your candle. Just make sure give your jar candles a nice long burn every so often to “reset” the wax memory and prevent any tunnelling. This will keep your candle looking great, smelling great, burning evenly, and all the other great things you want! * If you’re experiencing the dreaded “tunnelling” problem already, you may be able to fix it - see tip #3 below.

2) Keep your wood wick trimmed short and free of charred bits For optimal burn, keep your wood wick trimmed to about ⅛”, and clean off any burnt wood from previous use. Other than the tunnelling problem, if your wood wick candle won’t stay lit it’s probably because the wick is too long, or it needs to be trimmed clean of charred material. Remember it’s not the wood fuelling your candle’s flame, it’s the wax. The flame is drawing the wax upwards through the wick, so if it’s not trimmed short and clean, the wax can’t make it to the flame. For optimal burn, keep your wood wick trimmed to about ⅛” - this is shorter than you might think the wick should be - around the width of the metal part of a USB drive. You’ll also want to clean off any charred bits. For trimming, we’ve always found an old set of nail clippers or wire cutters to work great. In a pinch, you can always use a napkin and your fingers to gently break off the burnt parts of the wick. Just make sure to let your candle cool before trimming, as you don’t want any bits of ash or wick material left in the wax when you’re done. It’s much easier to clean this up when the wax is hard and cool!

3) How to fix a candle that’s tunnelling - If your wood wick or jar candle has developed some tunnelling from shorter burns, you can usually fix it - here’s how: First and best option: if your candle will stay lit, give it a good long burn until all the wax is melted to the edge of the jar, and you’ve effectively “reset” the memory of the wax. The flame height may vary when you do this, but as long as there is still a burn, it should continue to create a melt pool, just be patient. If your candle won’t stay lit because it is “drowning” in a wax pool, try using a paper towel or napkin to soak up some of the excess wax. Then wait for a minute or so, relight your candle, and repeat until your wick has room to breathe!

If you follow the 3 best practices mentioned above, your wood wick candles should burn nicely!

Candle Use Instructions

Before Lighting:
Before burning any of our candles, always trim the wick to ¼ inch. You can use a wick trimmer, nail clippers, or scissors. Long or crooked wicks can cause uneven burning, dripping or flaring.
Keep the wax clear of wick trimmings, match pieces and debris at all times.
Always burn a candle on a heat and fire safe surface. It should be heat resistant, sturdy, and large enough to contain any drips or melted wax.

ANY REFILL CANDLES MUST BE PLACED IN REFILL TIN BEFORE LIGHTING.


Burn candles in a well-ventilated room:
Avoid drafts, vents or air currents. This will help prevent rapid or uneven burning, sooting, and weak scent.
In general, it is recommended that you do not burn candles for longer than four hours and cool for at least two hours before relighting.
When lighting a candle, use long matches or a long-reach lighter. Keep your hair and loose clothing away from the flame.


While Burning:
Never leave a candle unattended.
Never burn a candle on or near anything that can catch fire. Keep burning candles away from furniture, drapes, bedding, carpets, books, paper, flammable decorations, or anything else that may easily burn.
Keep candles out of the reach of children and pets. Do not place lighted candles where they can be knocked over by children, pets or anyone else.
Never touch or move a candle while it is burning or while the wax is liquefied.
Place burning candles at least 10cm apart from one another. This is to make sure they don’t melt one another, or create their own drafts that will cause the candles to burn improperly.
Extinguish a candle if the flame becomes too high or flickers repeatedly. Let the candle cool, trim and straighten the wick, and check for unwanted drafts before re-lighting.
Never use a candle as a night light or while you may fall asleep.
Be very careful if using candles during a power cut.


When Extinguishing a Candle:
Always use caution when extinguishing a candle, whether by blowing out, using a snuffer, or with a wick dipper.  Do not use the lid to extinguish the candle.
Never use water to extinguish a candle. Water can cause the hot wax to splatter.
Make sure the candle is completely out and the wick ember is no longer glowing or smoking before walking away from the candle.
Don’t touch or move the candle until it has completely cooled.

Storing Your Candle:
Our candles are best stored top side up with the lid securely attached, at room temperature.  Cooler temperatures may cause the wax to shrink slightly resulting in a visible separation from the container, and warmer temps may induce melting or oiling of the top layer of wax - This is perfectly normal.

How to look after your wooden wick candle: Welcome
bottom of page